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Email Fraud

Help you Recognize and Avoid Phishing Scams

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電子郵件詐騙

幫助您了解及避免詐騙

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电子邮件诈骗

帮助您了解及避免诈骗

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What is Email fraud?

Internet scammers casting about for people's financial information have a new way to lure unsuspecting victims: They go "phishing". Phishing is a high-tech scam that uses spam or pop-up messages to deceive you into disclosing your credit card numbers, bank account information, Social Security number, passwords, or other sensitive information.

How does it work?

Phishers send an email, SMS or pop-up message that claims to be from a business or organization that you deal with such as your Internet service provider (ISP), bank, online payment service, or even a government agency. The message usually says that you need to "update" or "validate" your account information. It might threaten some dire consequence if you don't respond. The message directs you to a Web site that looks just like a legitimate organization's site, but it isn't. The purpose of the bogus site is to trick you into divulging your personal information so the operators can steal your identity and run up bills or commit crimes in your name.

If you get an email, SMS or pop-up message that asks for personal or financial information, do not reply or click on the link in the message. Legitimate companies don't ask for this information via email. If you are concerned about your account, contact the organization in the email using a telephone number you know to be genuine, or open a new Internet browser session and type in the company's correct Web address. In any case, don't cut and paste the link in the message.

Don't email personal or financial information. Email is not a secure method of transmitting personal information. If you initiate a transaction and want to provide your personal or financial information through an organization's Web site, look for indicators that the site is secure, such as a lock icon on the browser's status bar or a URL for a website that begins "https:" (the "s" stands for "secure"). Unfortunately, no indicator is foolproof; some phishers have forged security icons. 

Be wary of look-alike websites. Fraudsters can develop websites that look very similar to CTBC's website, with the purpose of deceiving you into entering your username and password. The URL's in these websites resemble our legitimate URL very closely. However, fraud websites' URLs are always a little different, such as https://www.ctbc-bank-usa.com (notice the dashes in the URL). Any URL that doesn't match CTBC's official website URL should not be trusted. 

How to protect yourself against email fraud?

  • If you get an email or pop-up message that asks for personal or financial information, do not reply or click on the link in the message. Legitimate companies don't ask for this information via email. If you are concerned about your account, contact the organization in the email using a telephone number you know to be genuine, or open a new Internet browser session and type in the company's correct Web address. In any case, don't cut and paste the link in the message.
  • Don't email personal or financial information. Email is not a secure method of transmitting personal information. If you initiate a transaction and want to provide your personal or financial information through an organization's Web site, look for indicators that the site is secure, like a lock icon on the browser's status bar or a URL for a website that begins "https:" (the "s" stands for "secure"). Unfortunately, no indicator is foolproof; some phishers have forged security icons.
  • Review credit card and bank account statements as soon as you receive them to determine whether there are any unauthorized charges. If your statement is late by more than a couple of days, call your credit card company or bank to confirm your billing address and account balances.
  • Use anti-virus software and keep it up to date. Some phishing emails contain software that can harm your computer or track your activities on the Internet without your knowledge. Anti-virus software and a firewall can protect you from inadvertently accepting such unwanted files. Anti-virus software scans incoming communications for troublesome files. Look for anti-virus software that recognizes current viruses as well as older ones; that can effectively reverse the damage; and that updates automatically.
  • A firewall helps make you invisible on the Internet and blocks all communications from unauthorized sources. It's especially important to run a firewall if you have a broadband connection. Finally, your operating system (like Windows or Linux) may offer free software "patches" to close holes in the system that hackers or phishers could exploit.
  • Be cautious about opening any attachment or downloading any files from emails you received, regardless of who sent them.

Where to report the email fraud?

Report suspicious activity to the FTC. If you get spam that is phishing for information, forward it to spam@uce.gov If you believe you've been scammed, file your complaint at www.ftc.gov. Visit http://www.ftc.gov/spam to learn other ways to avoid email scams and deal with deceptive spam.
 

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